1. SKIP_MENU
  2. SKIP_CONTENT
  3. SKIP_FOOTER
  • Realtà virtuale (dal n. 669 L'Informatore del Marmista)
  • Macchine virtuose (dal n. 667 L'Informatore del Marmista)
  • Al Cibart di Carrara (dal n. 667 L'Informatore del Marmista)
  • Marmo Rosso Verona per la Maternità (dal n. 669 L'Informatore del Marmista)
Realtà virtuale (dal n. 669 L'Informatore del Marmista)

Realtà virtuale (dal n. 669 L'Informatore del Marmista)

Macchine virtuose  (dal n. 667 L'Informatore del Marmista)

Macchine virtuose (dal n. 667 L'Informatore del Marmista)

Al Cibart di Carrara (dal n. 667 L'Informatore del Marmista)

Al Cibart di Carrara (dal n. 667 L'Informatore del Marmista)

Marmo Rosso Verona per la Maternità  (dal n. 669 L'Informatore del  Marmista)

Marmo Rosso Verona per la Maternità (dal n. 669 L'Informatore del Marmista)



Contents
MATERIALS  Stones of the Malta archipelago  STATISTICS Ancora in calo l'export di marmi e graniti   COLUMNS Cultural events | Exhibitions | Classified advertisements | Stone data sheet | Notes

 

Article of the month
Stones of the Malta archipelago by Laura Fiora
The Malta archipelago measures 316 square kilometres and is made up of the islands of Malta, Gozo and Comino, as well as a number of minor islands; it is located exactly in the centre of the Mediterranean, 96 km south of Sicily. It is home to an impressive monumental heritage built in local stone over a period of time going back as many as seven thousand years - from pre-history to contemporary times. The islands are an open-air museum with megalithic temples, Renaissance cathedrals, Baroque palaces, churches, modern and contemporary constructions, fountains, aqueducts, river and sea shore embankments and cemeteries - the local stone has been processed and used with great skill. Rocks similar to those from Malta have been used in various Mediterranean countries (especially Italy, Turkey, Israel, Libya, Tunisia and Spain - they are almost identical to materials worked around Ragusa, in Sicily, and others from the Sirte outcrop in Libya). The islands of Malta also have rocks of other origins in local churches and palaces: the buildings in Valletta and Medina especially boast an extraordinary wealth of “marbles” of various origins in their floorings, with applications of precious materials such as malachite and lapis lazuli.... 

« Back